Keynote Speeches at ICGP’17


ICGP’17 presents outstanding and insightful keynote speeches with the potential to raise awareness and open new perspectives for researchers and practitioners on a cutting edge topic which deals with recent concerns on how women’s political rights can be sustained in an age of uncertainty, where more nations in many parts of the world seem to be rolling back hard fought democratic freedoms.

The keynote speeches will set the tone for the conference, provide the fundamental note that resonates throughout the rest of the event and also provoke or motivate participants to look across traditional borders of disciplines.

Keynote speakers

ICGP’17 proudly presents the following keynote speakers:

NOUZHA GUESSOUS

NOUZHA GUESSOUS

Professor.
Hassan II University.
Morocco.

Women in Current Moroccan society: Discrepancies between the Law, the Social Practices and the Culture

Abstract

Women’s rights have been historically and universally on the rise with ups and downs since the emergence and development of Human rights doctrine. In Morocco like in many majority Muslim societies, major changes have taken place during the last decades. In the current international context of globalization; intercommunity relations through immigration and media have deeply affected the traditional family and social organization in a relatively short period of time. Individual practices impacted on Gender social roles and relationship. Old discriminatory laws derived from traditions of religious and cultural grounds that were more or less adapted to previous socioeconomic historical circumstances came into conflict with the current perceptions and needs for the building of a modern state and a democratic society. Therefore and thanks to women and human rights organizations, important changes took place in the national law since year 2000 (Family, Citizenship, Constitutional, Labor and Penal law), with reference to the universal corpus of international law. Positive actions were taken to promote women’s political representation. To what extend could these legal changes impact on Moroccan women’s daily life and on their social status? Many examples deriving from the law implementation show clear discrepancies within and between the law, the social practices and the culture. More, in this transitional phase, economic and /or sociopolitical crisis can impact on the democratic process with attempts to roll back some gains in human rights in general and women rights in particular arguing on traditions and misuse of religion. The use and abuse of popular faith in non secular regimes and societies can be used to legitimize social injustice in general, and mostly against women. In such context, how to face the double challenge of preventing and avoiding rescinding women's rights while protecting and reinforcing the gains?

Biography

Nouzha Guessous is a Moroccan Medical Biologist, Researcher and consultant in Human Rights and Bioethics. Professor of Hassan II University of Casablanca (Morocco), she is a Founding Member of the Moroccan Organization of Human Rights (1988) and a researcher and activist for Women’s Rights.
As such, she was member of the Royal Advisory Commission for the revision of the Moroccan Family Code (2002-2004). In the field of Bioethics, she has been member of the International Bioethics Committee of UNESCO from 2000 and 2007 and has been elected as the chair for 2005-2007.
Since 2008 she is member of the ALECSO Ethics Committee for Science and technology. In the two topics of her expertise, she is author of numerous scientific papers and of Newspaper Tribunes, as well as co-Author of books and Encyclopedia published in Morocco and internationally.
For her work in the Royal Advisory Commission for the revision of the Moroccan Family Code, she has been decorated in 10 October 2003 by His Majesty King Mohamed VI with the Wissam of the National Merit of the Rank of Commandant. For her work in the fields of Human Rights and Bioethics, she has been decorated on 29 October 2008 with the Legion of Honor of the French Republic of the rank of Chevalier.

FATIMA SADIQI

FATIMA SADIQI

Professor of Linguistics and Gender Studies.
University of Fez.
Morocco.

The Sources of Political Authority in North Africa: A Gender Perspective

Abstract

The overarching socio-cultural and historical conditionings of North Africa make of it an interesting multilingual and multicultural region. The sources of authority in this region may be categorized into two main types: primary and secondary. The primary sources have stronger abstract cultural weight and include patriarchy, religion, language, the urban/modernity nexus, and the ruling systems; and the secondary sources include the family, the mosque, the school, the urban street, the workplace, and modern institutions, such as the Makhzen (the king’s immediate circle) in Morocco, the parliament and the court of justice. Each primary is “relayed” by a secondary source: hence patriarchy is relayed by the family, religion by the mosque, language by the school, the urban/modernity nexus by the street and workplace, and monarchy by the ruling systems, the parliament and the court of justice. Hence, the two sources of authority feed into, intersect with , and strengthen each other. Gender is central to the maintenance of this cross-feeding and the power dynamics it generates. These ideas are based on my own work and fieldwork.

Biography

Fatima Sadiqi’s work focuses on women’s issues in modern North Africa, the Middle East, and the Mediterranean world. She is author and editor of numerous volumes and journal issues, including Women, Gender and Language (Brill 2003), Women’s Activism and the Public Sphere: Local/Global Linkages (Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies 2006), Women and Knowledge in the Mediterranean (Routledge 2013), Moroccan Feminist Discourses (Palgrave Macmillan 2014), and Women’s Movements in the Post-“Arab Spring” North Africa (2016). Fatima Sadiqi is also a public speaker in many languages and a member of many national and international scholarly and policy-making boards.
She served as Director General of the Fez Festival of Sacred Music and an Administrative Board Member of the Royal Institute of the Amazigh Language and Culture (IRCAM). She is currently a Global Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center. Her upcoming book is about Daesh ideology and women’s rights in the Middle East and North Africa.
Professor Sadiqi taught at Harvard University, Pomona College, and at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. She is currently a Global Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center. Her upcoming book is about Daesh ideology and women’s rights in the Middle East and North Africa.

DAHLERUP DRUDE

DAHLERUP DRUDE

Professor of Political Science.
University of Stockholm.
Sweden.

Women’s Contribution to a Democracy in Crisis

Abstract

Starting from the assumption that we cannot speak of democracy if women are not fully included in political decision-making, we must ask what role women and various groups of women can have in the processes of democratization. For long, women were seen as the laggards in the transitions to democracy. But women’s world-wide mobilization for inclusion of all under-represented groups may be a catalyst for vitalization of both new and old democracies. Important are demands for formalization and transparency of the processes of selection of candidates for elections and various appointments, rejecting the ‘old boys’ networks’. Gender quotas for elections are now adopted by law in more than 80 countries globally. But why have so many parliaments, all male dominated, passed quota laws? This leads us to a more general question of what kind of power women can mobilize in a male dominated world, nationally as well as in global governance?

Biography

Drude Dahlerup is professor of Political Science at the University of Stockholm. She graduated from University of Aarhus in Denmark. Expert on how to empower women in politics, academia and in the labour marked.
She works as consultant for UN and other international organizations to countries around the world on women in politics, with focus on electoral systems and quota systems..
She led the first study of the world-wide trend of adopting gender quotas, which resulted in the edited book, Women, Quotas and Politics (ed., Routledge 2006). Among her newest work is the book Breaking Male Dominance in Old Democracies (with Monique Leyenaar, Oxford University Press, 2013).
She was 2012-15 member of the Global Civil Society Advisory Group to the executive director of UN Women.
Her forthcoming book “Has Democracy failed Women?” will be published by Polity Press, late 2017.

miriam cooke

miriam cooke

Braxton Craven Distinguished Professor of Arab Cultures at Duke University.
USA.

Contesting Fatwa 64: Islamic State, Women and Violence

Abstract

" On May 7, 2015 Zainab Bangura, UN Special Envoy on Sexual Violence in Conflict warned that Islamic State had “ institutionalized sexual violence and the brutalization of women as a central aspect of their ideology and operations, using it as a tactic of terrorism to advance their key strategic objectives." What is the international community doing to protect women from Islamic State's Fatwa 64 and bring the rapists to justice?

Biography

miriam cooke is has been a visiting professor in Tunisia, Romania, Indonesia, Qatar and Istanbul. She serves on several national and international advisory boards, including academic journals and institutions. She is editor of the Journal for Middle East Women’s Studies. Her writings have focused on the intersection of gender and war in modern Arabic literature and on Arab women writers’ constructions of Islamic feminism.
She has also written about Arab cultures with a concentration on Syria, the Arab Gulf and the networked connections among Arabs and Muslims around the world. She is the author of several monographs that include War’s Other Voices: Women Writers on the Lebanese Civil War (1987), Women and the War Story (1997); Women Claim Islam (2001); Dissident Syria: Making Oppositional Arts Official (2007), Nazira Zeineddine: A Pioneer of Islamic Feminism (2010), Tribal Modern: Branding New Nations in the Arab Gulf (2014) and Dancing in Damascus: Creativity, Resilience and the Syrian Revolution (2017). She has also published a novel, Hayati, My Life (2000). Several books and articles have been translated into Arabic, Chinese, Dutch and German.

AILI MARI TRIPP

AILI MARI TRIPP

Center for Research on Gender and Women.
University of Wisconsin-Madison.
USA.

Global Women’s Rights in an Era of Democratic Uncertainty: Challenges and Opportunities

Abstract

The expansion of democracy has historically been linked to the expansion women's rights and citizenship. Today the global crisis in democracy has the potential to derail the fragile successes that have been made in enhancing women's political representation globally. There has been over a decade of overall decline in the numbers of democracies globally, according to Freedom House, with serious challenges being posed to democracy from the US to Denmark, Poland, South Africa, South Korea and Morocco. Populism, nationalism and extremism are threatening institutions and civic values, not only non-democratic countries and fragile or semi-democracies, but now also in old democracies. The withdrawal of the US from being a global leader and advocate of human rights and democratization creates new instability in the world order, as Russia carries out flagrant interference in elections around the world and continues its illegal occupation of Ukraine. The state-sanctioned violations of human rights in Philippines, South Sudan, Thailand and Myanmar pose new challenges to security in these countries. This paper explores the various ways in which democracy has been linked to women's rights historically (through the expansion of labor, civil rights, human rights, and women's movements) in different geopolitical contexts grounded in different understandings of citizenship. It examines what implications these new anti-democratic trends have women's rights, particularly political rights. It also looks at the transnational dimension of these trends.

Biography

Aili Mari Tripp is Professor of Political Science and Evjue Bascom Professor in Gender and Women’s Studies at the Center for Research on Gender and Women at University of Wisconsin-Madison. Tripp’s research has focused on women and politics in Africa (including North Africa), women’s movements in Africa, transnational feminism, African politics, and on the informal economy in Africa. She has been conducting a comparative study on women and legal reform in the Maghrib and held a Fulbright Fellowship in Morocco and was based at Al Akhawayn University (2015-2016). She was on leave in the Fall of 2016 with a Feminist Scholars Award from the Center for Research on Gender and Women at UW-Madison and during the Spring 2017 is a residential fellow at the American Academy in Berlin. She is also coordinating a related research project on Women and Peacebuilding in Africa, funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York and the Foreign Ministry of Norway, involving research in northern Nigeria, South Sudan, Sudan, Algeria, and Somalia.
Her most recent book is Women and Power in Post-Conflict Africa (Cambridge University Press, 2015). She is author of several award winning books, including Museveni’s Uganda: Paradoxes of Power in a Hybrid Regime (2010), African Women’s Movements: Transforming Political Landscapes (2009) with Isabel Casimiro, Joy Kwesiga, and Alice Mungwa, and Women and Politics in Uganda (2000). She has co-edited (with Myra Marx Ferree and Christina Ewig) Gender, Violence, and Human Security: Critical Feminist Perspectives (2013), (with Myra Marx Ferree) Global Feminism: Transnational Women’s Activism (2006), Organizing, and Human Rights, and (with Joy Kwesiga) The Women’s Movement in Uganda: History, Challenges and Prospects (2002).